Ferring Pharmaceuticals selects Sinequa and Atos to boost Global Cognitive Search Capabilities for R&D

ferring-logoAs a testament of Sinequa’s fast growing footprint among leading life sciences organizations, we are very excited to announce that Ferring Pharmaceuticals selected Sinequa and Atos to boost its global cognitive search capabilities. Sinequa’s Cognitive Search & Analytics solution was recently deployed at Ferring Pharmaceuticals with Atos as the consulting and integration partner to empower the organization’s Global Pharmaceutical R&D group to look deeply into vast scientific research data sets in order to generate new insights and accelerate innovation

Headquartered in Switzerland, Ferring Pharmaceuticals is a research-driven, specialty biopharmaceutical group active in global markets. A leader in reproductive and maternal health, Ferring has been developing treatments for mothers and babies for over 50 years. Today, over one third of the company’s research and development investment goes towards finding innovative treatments to help mothers and babies, from conception to birth. Ferring has its own operating subsidiaries in nearly 60 countries and markets its products in 110 countries.

In today’s world, especially in the life sciences industry, it is impossible for humans alone to search, process and analyze all the world’s available scientific and research data, Sinequa’s Cognitive Search & Analytics platform  makes this scientific knowledge accessible any time by any given researchers. As Sinequa continues to expand its footprint in this very competitive industry, we are very pleased to count Ferring Pharmaceuticals among our customers. Together with our partner Atos, we are committed to help Ferring improve insights and facilitate innovation.

- Stéphane Kirchacker, vice president Sales, EMEA at Sinequa

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Atos, Sinequa’s strategic global premium partner was selected to design, implement, support and operate the platform at Ferring Pharmaceuticals to deliver the highest possible relevancies on search for the R&D teams in different locations.

Sinequa’s solution is bringing the power of AI to Enterprise Search to provide Ferring a “future proof” solution that offers a whole range of opportunities for future innovations. The dilemma of pharmaceuticals is to find the needle in the haystack – scientists need to screen tens of millions of documents from internal and external sources, from structured and unstructured data for identifying relations between genes, drugs, Mechanism of Action (MoA) and finding the right skilled subject matter experts. Other departments like Regulatory & Compliance, Legal & IP, Marketing & Sales, Clinical Trials, HR and more can benefit from customized Search-based applications on the same platform – finding relevant information instantly for fact-based decisions – no waste of time anymore.

-Alex Halbeisen, Expert Sales Big Data & Analytics at Atos

 

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Streamline Global Manufacturing with the Information Driven Supply Chain

This article was originally published in Manufacturing Business Technology.

A new kind of manufacturing company is emerging that leverages big data and analytics for a unified view of the supply chain. This new approach provides supply chain insights that enable these organizations to respond quickly and decisively to changing conditions despite geographically dispersed suppliers and customers. And yet at the same time, they can also pursue long-term opportunities by identifying products, parts and components across all the data sources where supply and demand spans states, countries and continents.

No matter the supply chain model, customers expect quality service, on-time delivery and the right product every time, which can be challenging if an organization manages erratic supply and demand on a global basis.

For most organizations, products consist of numerous parts that move through the enterprise and its network of suppliers, creating a need for parts logistics. Every part number within the organization takes on a life of its own and every department must have access to all the information surrounding it.

As organizations build new products, and service existing ones, they need cohesive and comprehensive visibility for a unified view of the entire supply chain.  This approach helps organizations optimize their supply chain and increase responsiveness by focusing on achieving greater visibility into products and parts inventory. Organizations that focus on these objectives can tighten the gaps in their supply chain and enhance their overall operations.

Supply Chain Unification

A unified view of the supply chain connects the enterprise and suppliers seamlessly to various applications and databases—such as enterprise resource planning, a data warehouse and customer relationship management systems.

This connected environment helps organizations keep abreast of the manufacturing process and supply chain management, and share relevant information across design, engineering, procurement, quality control and more. From understanding customer needs to building requirements, product prototyping and selling products, everything is streamlined and simplified across disparate systems.

By adopting a unified view of the supply chain, organizations can see what parts are in stock, which suppliers they re-order from and if those suppliers have available inventory. This gives engineers visibility into the specifications of components, the mean times between failures
for components, discontinuation plans and recent negative reports. It also promotes accurate shipping expectations and on-time delivery, while connecting all departments and partners in the supply chain into one efficient manufacturing shop.

Finding the right part information when and where needed

An information-driven supply chain makes it easier for workers to search and locate specific parts for production. Workers can create alerts to be notified when relevant information surfaces. Empowered and informed workers can then concentrate on manufacturing products on schedule.

A unified view of the supply chain helps engineers know who has previously worked with each part and learn from their experiences. If a component is found faulty during production, engineers could spend days trying to find who completed the original design. A unified view of the supply chain helps pinpoint the most knowledgeable workers and provides immediate access to information about the component and its design specifications. By empowering engineers, organizations are better able to meet customer demands.

This approach also empowers sales with information about specific parts to understand when to sell a specific version, and to know who to talk to if they need more information. Customers then get a confident, knowledgeable sales associate to help them make the right decision.

Knowing how and where to get parts in a hurry

Organizations must be able to respond immediately to customers who need replacement parts and immediate service. If a part is not available, they must know expected shipment dates, transit times and who can supply it. This is increasingly challenging with globally distributed suppliers and a dispersed customer base.

A unified view of the supply chain can resolve this issue by giving customer service representatives visibility into all parts across the enterprise, regardless of location, repository or format in which the information is stored. It can also extend access to information from supplier sites and applications.

To assist customers with support requests, customer service representatives need to be aware of past problems and how to identify and resolve them. With a unified view of the supply chain, they immediately know the parts associated with a problem and how it can be fixed.

In the final analysis, managing the supply chain is about information access. Although many applications are necessary to manage information at different stages of the supply chain, a unified view provides cohesive visibility across all applications that manage information about products, suppliers and customers. It is a critical part of streamlining and optimizing the use of an organization’s supply chain.

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