Big Projects on Track: Achieving the Goals of Long, Complex Projects

big-track-manufacturing-06-2019-1024Big projects, well executed, are the lifeblood of large, distributed manufacturing organizations.

Such projects solve existing and future problems that enable the organization and its stakeholders (and sometimes all of society) to move forward economically. These projects are naturally chaotic and require significant organization and planning to manage the chaos. Successfully executing these projects also means bringing together the right people and making it easy for them to collaborate, share ideas and provide inspiration.Today’s large, distributed manufacturing organizations cannot successfully plan and execute big projects without intelligent automation to help connect project stakeholders to relevant information and to each other.

Download the Big Projects On Track solution white paper to learn how one of the largest rolling stock manufacturers in the world addressed this challenge.

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Sinequa Releases Next Generation User Experience Framework

Sinequa invested significantly in the latest release of its product to evolve the way the platform presents insights to end users, automatically adapting to each user’s device. This required a complete overhaul of the user interface framework to a responsive design based on Angular 7 that opens up application development on the Sinequa platform to a much wider audience.

Angular Framework

“We are very grateful for the practical insights provided by our customer base and partner network, we could not have done it without them,” said Philippe Motet, vice president of engineering at Sinequa . “This next generation framework will open up the floodgates for application developers worldwide to benefit from the power of the Sinequa platform quickly and without a hefty learning curve to enhance the user experience.“

Based on the newly released responsive design framework, Sinequa tackled the revamping of its platform user interface with the help of a strategic UI design consultancy. This initiative resulted in a simplified and streamlined end user experience powered by redesigned UI components purposefully calibrated to align with end user needs.

This represents the most visible evolution of the Sinequa platform and adds to a growing list of innovations released by the company. Other recent innovations released by Sinequa include numerous enhancements to its linguistic processing engine as well as deep integration with market leading platforms like Spark for supervised machine learning and Tensorflow for unsupervised deep learning.

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How Biopharmaceutical Companies Can Fish Relevant Information From A Sea Of Data

This article originally appeared in Bio-IT World

Content and data in the biopharmaceutical industry are complex and growing at an exponential rate. Terabytes from research and development, testing, lab reports, and patients reside in sources such as databases, emails, scientific publications, and medical records. Information that could be crucial to research can be found in emails, videos, recorded patient interviews, and social media.

school-of-fish

Extracting usable information from what’s available represents a tremendous opportunity, but the sheer volume presents a challenge as well. Add to that challenge the size of biopharmaceutical companies, with tens of thousands of R&D experts often distributed around the world, and the plethora of regulations that the industry must adhere to—and it’s difficult to see how anyone could bring all of that content and data together to make sense of it.

Information instrumental to developing the next blockbuster drug might be hidden anywhere, buried in a multitude of silos throughout the organization.

Companies that leverage automation to sift through all their content and data, in all its complexity and volume, to find relevant information have an edge in researching and developing new drugs and conducting clinical trials.

This is simply not a task that can be tackled by humans alone—there is just too much to go through. And common keyword searches are not enough, as they won’t tell you that a paper is relevant if the search terms don’t appear in it, or if a video has the answer unless the keywords are in the metadata of the video.

Today, companies can get help from insight engines, which leverage a combination of sophisticated indexing, artificial intelligence, and natural language processing for linguistic and semantic analyses to identify what a text is about, look for synonyms and extract related concepts. Gartner notes that insight engines, “enable richer indexes, more complex queries, elaborated relevancy methods, and multiple touchpoints for the delivery of data (for machines) and information (for people).” A proper insight engine does this at speed, across languages, and in all kinds of media.

For biopharmaceuticals, this is particularly powerful, allowing them to correlate and share research in all forms over widely distributed research teams. Here are several ways biopharma companies can use insight engines to accelerate their research.

Find A Network Of Experts

Many companies struggle to create the best teams for new projects because expertise is hidden in large, geographically-distributed organizations with multiple divisions. A drug repositioning project might require a range of experts on related drugs, molecules, and their mechanisms of action, medical experts, geneticists, and biochemists. Identifying those experts within a vast organization can be challenging. But insight engines can analyze thousands of documents and other digital artifacts to see who has experience with relevant projects.

The technology can go further, identifying which experts’ work is connected. If they appear together in a document, interact within a forum, or even communicate significantly via email, an insight engine can see that connection and deduce that the work is related. Companies can then create an “expert graph” of people whose work intersects to build future teams.

This technique can extend beyond the borders of the company, helping to identify the most promising collaboration partners outside the company in a given field, based on publicly available data, such as trial reports, patent filings and reports from previous collaboration projects.

Generate R&D News Alerts

Biopharma companies can also use insight engines to watch for new developments in drug research and stay on top of the latest trends. These news alerts can go beyond typical media sources to include scientific publications, clinical trial reports, and patent filings.

This capability can be used on SharePoint, Documentum, or other sources within a large company to surface relevant information. An insight engine ensures the right information gets to the right people in the right context, and in a timely way.

Optimize Clinical Trials

Clinical trials that stretch over many years generate millions of datasets for every drug and study provide a treasure trove of data. Biostatisticians can ensure they get a comprehensive list of patients having certain diseases within trials on a drug, something nearly impossible with traditional methods.

They can also search and analyze across many drugs and studies, across content and data silos. Over time, this allows biopharmaceutical companies’ growing number of clinical trials to become a valuable asset that can be easily leveraged across a growing number of use cases.

All of these uses can lead to biopharma companies developing new drugs more quickly and getting them to market faster—necessary as these companies face tremendous pressure to innovate quickly and develop new promising drugs as patents for older drugs expire. With insight engines, they can make every part of the journey more efficient, from research, to clinical trials, to regulatory processes, presenting incredible opportunities for everyone in this field.

 

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3 Ways Manufacturers Can Leverage Insight Engines

This article was originally published on Manufacturing.net.

As distributed manufacturing gains adoption by some of the world’s largest companies, products are finding their way into the hands of customers faster than ever before. But in the process, companies are becoming increasingly disconnected and less efficient in new areas.  Unlike in traditional manufacturing, where materials are assembled in remote, centralized factories and shipped to customers, distributed manufacturing takes place at multiple, decentralized plants where products are assembled closer to the customer.

Global manufacturing

The process of leveraging a network of geographically dispersed manufacturing facilities connected over the Internet helps eliminate many of the inefficiencies of traditional manufacturing. However, distributed manufacturing creates new challenges in the form of separate entities, languages and processes.

Teams once gathered under a single roof are now spread across multiple sites, working on projects and programs unique to their local area. These distributed teams are inadvertently scattering knowledge and data across continents and systems, creating information silos that leave workers disconnected.

Content and data have been scattered across a myriad of applications and repositories without any means for end users to surface accurate information with any confidence. In some cases, access to critical institutional knowledge, insights and innovation is restricted to a small few. As a result, disparate teams are spending countless hours making and solving the same problem over and over again, lowering productivity and delaying projects.

A digital solutions manager at a global manufacturing firm once told me, “We had thousands and thousands and thousands of places where our documents were shared, managed by check-in, check-out. In fact, we once had thousands of applications with no search capabilities.”

But once information is accessible from a single place, there are no longer countless teams scavenging for data and insights. With insight engines, manufacturers are bringing the best people together for new projects. Critical parts are easier to locate instead of rebuilding or re-designing them. Even proposals and RFP responses are being developed faster with information found and shared from other RFPs.

These improvements are the result of insight engines that combine cognitive analytics, artificial intelligence and NLP (natural language processing) to helps computers understand, interpret and manipulate human languages, dialects and patterns.

This technology helps manufacturers quickly respond to changing conditions and identify products, parts and components across multiple data sources despite their distance from one another. Here are three ways manufacturers can leverage insight engines to rediscover their synergies and avoid mistakes.

Building Teams Through a Patchwork of Data

Many companies struggle to create the best teams for new projects because expertise is hidden in large organizations with multiple divisions and product groups. Sometimes this task is made more difficult by employees who fail to enter their background and experience in their HR profiles or update them with new skills or certifications.

AI-powered insight engines leverage NLP to surface information from large volumes of data stored in hundreds of millions of files, and thousands of repositories and databases to uncover work histories, experience on different projects, expertise, training and education in order to locate experts. Projects employees have worked on, languages they write in, and locations where they’ve traveled are all easily queried and analyzed to identify experts within the company.

Avoiding Duplication of New Parts

In a distributed environment, it’s difficult to find parts across systems and continents. Sometimes it’s easier to make new ones. That’s because parts are generally indexed by labels, which can be difficult to identify correctly. As a result, the exact same part is recreated, sometimes up to five times, each version with its own label.

This is a complete waste of time and money. And when a part is recreated, there’s a greater chance of a new flaw being introduced, which can be catastrophic in industries like transportation or medical devices.

With insight engines, parts data can be contextualized for engineers to identify duplicate parts and eliminate duplications. For any company with a broad base of engineers, the cost savings from this approach can be enormous.

Increasing the efficiency of proposal development

Companies with multiple departments and divisions often fail to share technical information for sales proposals and RFPs. Consequently, proposals for an opportunity in one part of the world with many of the same requirements as others in different markets or regions must be developed from scratch.

And, if questions arise during the proposal process, it is time-consuming and difficult to get answers from engineers. Acquiring new customers in a complex environment with a highly engineered, configurable project is time-consuming by its nature. The inaccessibility of data makes it worse.

Insight engines surface information in context across emails, databases, and records. With this information in hand, companies can respond faster to sales opportunities and present a common face for the company overall.

In all three of these scenarios, information and insights are securely surfaced from content and data in every application and every repository from every location across globally distributed companies, which enables teams to cultivate, improve quality and take advantage of new opportunities.

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Sinequa Featured in IDC Technology Spotlight Dedicated to Financial Services Organizations

ScreenHunter_1549 Jan. 16 16.48With increased regulatory pressures, data silo proliferation and cognitive drain on analysts, AI-powered platforms become a key enabler to extract insights from data.

Today, we announced that Sinequa is featured in a new IDC Technology Spotlight report: Financial Services Organizations: Extracting Powerful Insights with AI-Powered Platforms. The report, written by Steven D’Alfonso, research director, IDC Financial Insights, and David Schubmehl, research director, Cognitive/AI Systems, highlights the importance of AI-powered platforms in their ability to extract insights from data as well as the need for financial services organizations (FSOs) to improve their capabilities to derive insights from the data they possess.

According to the report, collecting and maintaining increased amounts of data related to their clients and portfolios can provide major opportunities to improve the customer experience and increase revenue while reducing risk. But at the same time, too much data can be a cognitive drain on analysts and knowledge workers. This increasing need to collect data from multiple applications requires FSO stakeholders to organize and provision their data in ways that allow analysts to extract meaningful insights. AI can help FSOs mature from being data-driven to being information-driven.

“Over the years, Sinequa has continued to expand its footprint within leading financial institutions such as Credit Agricole, DZ Bank, LCL, Navy Federal Credit Union, and U.S. Bank as our platform enables them to tackle the challenges highlighted in this report,” said Scott Parker, director of product marketing at Sinequa. “By offering a broad-based AI-powered platform including search, content analytics, semantic understanding and auto categorization technologies, Sinequa provides relevant insights to users in their work environments, while supporting a range of machine learning algorithms and capabilities to improve findability and relevance, allowing FSOs to access the information they need when they need it.”

With the demand for AI technologies that enable intelligent analytics increasing every year, IDC estimates that “by 2022 spending on AI technologies will grow to over $8 billion, up from $2 billion in 2017.” Sinequa has in the past offered a flexible information collection, access and analysis architecture and now provides cognitive capabilities, such as machine learning, natural language processing, improved relevance and better decision support, while offering intuitive user and data interaction capabilities.

To learn more, click here or on the banner below to sign up for the webinar.

idc-finance-webinar

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